Native American Totems

Discovering the medicine and lessons learned from the spirits of animals and all living things.

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We can teach children and should teach our children about Native American Totems along with sharing tribal stories and lore with them.  Back in December of 2009, we talked about Raven as one of the birth totems. We learned that Raven is considered to be a balance between man and nature.

Raven has a story in just about every Tribal Tradition.  Some look at Raven as an omen of good luck while others see him as bad luck.  Brother Raven can shape-shift and sometimes in his stories he can be a bit of a trickster. For young children to learn the old stories it is helpful to read them a book with good visuals for them to relate to.

I found a book on Amazon that I think would be good to share with children ages 4 to 8.  The story originated with the Pacific Coast Natives  and is retold and illustrated by Gerald McDermott.  It tells about how Raven brought light and warmth to the humans on Mother Earth who were living in darkness.  Raven took pity on them and devises a plan.


Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest

This wonderful story takes children on a picture adventure along with a story that they can easily comprehend and enjoy.  It can be purchased in both hardcover or paperback.

Gerald McDermott is an award winning illustrator and weaver of tales from ancient myths and legends from many cultures. I think he helps children to not only enjoy a delightful tale but to understand different cultures and be more accepting of the differences and similarities.

Raven A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest would be a good book to begin sharing with your children or grandchildren stories of the Native American Totems.

~Mitakuye Oyasin! We are all related

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